Cyberbullying

It’s great to have access to a huge amount of technological resources which were never available when I was in school.  But there’s also a darker side: cyberbullying.  As an educator who blogs about integrating technology with education, I feel an obligation to also address this issue.

To that end, this page is a library of different resources which focus on bullying in general, and cyberbullying in particular: links to videos, websites, and books, as well as a list of peer-reviewed journal articles.  I will add more as I find them, and if you know of any others, please let me know and I’ll add them.  Alternatively, you can add them in the comments below.


Videos






Links


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Internet Safety and Cyberbullying Presentations for Schools, Community and Organisations

Our mission is to equip children, teenagers and adults with the skills and knowledge to enable them to use the internet safely whilst making them aware of their rights and responsibilities in the cyberworld.


50 Blogs on Bullying Every Teacher Should Read

@ Masters in Education
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http://www.bullying.org/

Where you are not alone.
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http://www.cyberbullying.us/

Cyberbullying Research Centre
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http://www.cyberbullying.info/

Go on an interactive journey through a detective’s office to learn about cyberbullying.
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Parent Advice: Cyberbullying Tips

@ Commonsense Media – full of tips for dealing with cyberbullying.
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What Is Cyberbullying?

A PDF article by Chris Webster
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http://stopcyberbullying.org/

What cyberbullying is, how it works and how to understand and deal with cyberbullies.
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Spotlight On Cyberbullying

Australian school communities getting to the heart of the matter.
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Cybersmart

Internet safety resources for children, young people, parents and teachers.
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Lifeline: Cyberbullying

Information and tips for dealing with cyberbullying.
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Dealing with Bullies

@ kidshealth.org
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How to Handle Schoolyard Bullying

@ Mothers Over 40
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Bullies: How to Handle It

@ It’s My Life
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How to Deal with Workplace Bullying

@ bullyonline.org
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Bullying News: Keeping You In The Picture

@ bullyonline.org
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Books


“The Bully, The Bullied, and The Bystander: From Preschool to High School” by Barbara Coloroso, updated edition, 2009, Harper Resource

It’s the deadliest combination going: bullies who terrorize, bullied kids who are afraid to tell, bystanders who watch, and adults who see the incidents as a normal part of childhood. All it takes to understand that this is a recipe for tragedy is a glance at headlines across the country. In this updated edition ofThe Bully, the Bullied, and the Bystander, which includes a new section on cyberbullying, one of the world’s most trusted parenting educators gives parents, caregivers, educators—and most of all, kids—the tools to break the cycle of violence.

ebooks.com *** Google Books *** Amazon.com


“Taking the Bully By The Horns (A children’s version of the bestselling book “Nasty People”)” by Kathy Noll and Jay Carter Psy.D., 2004, Unicorn Press

Intended for children to read themselves, since it is written in first person and speaks directly to the child/young teen. It could also be read to a class by a teacher, or shared with a younger child by a parent. Even adults have benefitted from reading the book, to help themselves with their own bullying and self-esteem issues. It is not only designed to help the victim, but is also the only book that has a chapter speaking directly to the BULLIES.

ebooks.com *** Google Books *** Amazon.com


“Nasty People” by Jay Carter Psy.D., Revised Edition 2003, McGaw Hill.

Everyone knows a person who has been hurt, betrayed, or degraded by nasty individuals or has experienced it themselves. In three books, Jay Carter, Psy. D., shows readers how to stop this cycle of overt and covert abuse, without resorting to nasty tactics. Now for the first time, this series is released together to cover all areas of dealing with difficult people. With straight-talking advice, real-life anecdotes, and psychology that makes sense, Carter explains how to handle and stop painful behavior that harms both the perpetrator and the victim.

ebooks.com *** Google Books *** Amazon.com


“The No Asshole Rule: Building a Civilized Workplace and Surviving One That Isn’t” by Robert I. Sutton, 2007, Warner Business Books

The No Asshole Rule was awarded a Quill Award as the Best Business Book of 2007. When Robert Sutton’s “No Asshole Rule” appeared in the Harvard Business Review, readers of this staid publication were amazed at the outpouring of support for this landmark essay. The idea was based on the notion, as adapted in hugely successful companies like Google and SAS, that employees with malicious intents or negative attitudes destroyed any sort of productive and pleasant working environment, and would hinder the entire operation’s success.

ebooks.com *** Google Books *** Amazon.com


“The Power of a Positive No” by William Ury, Ph.D., 2007, Hodder Mobius

This indispensable book gives you a simple three-step method for saying a Positive No. It will show you how to assert and defend your key interests; how to make your No firm and strong; how to resist the other side’s aggression and manipulation; and how to do all this while still getting to Yes. In the end, the Positive No will help you get not just to any Yes but to the right Yes, the one that truly serves your interests.

ebooks.com *** Google Books *** Amazon.com


“Why We Hate: Understanding, Curbing, and Eliminating Hate in Ourselves and Our World” by Rush W. Dozier Jr., 2002, McGraw Hill

Why We Hate examines the biological origins and manifestations of this most toxic of human emotions and shows specific steps to take to combat it. Neuroscientists have discovered that hate is a primitive survival response that combines prejudice and extreme anger. These new findings provide fundamental insights into how hate affects human behavior. Based on these insights and on extensive scientific research in fields ranging from anthropology to zoology, Why We Hate presents readers with a comprehensive nine-step strategy for controlling and eliminating hate.

Google Books *** Amazon.com


Journal Articles


These articles are just a tiny number of the literally thousands of peer-reviewed sources out there about bullying:

Cowie, H., Naylor, P., Rivers, I., Smith, P.K., Pereira, B. (2002). Measuring workplace bullying. Aggression and violent behavior, 7(1), 33-51. DOI: 10.1016/S1359-1789(00)00034-3

Fanning, K. (2005). Bullying. Junior scholastic, 107(15), 4-5. Document ID: 810425481

Feinberg, T., & Robey, N. (2009). Cyberbullying. The education digest, 74(7), 26-31. Document ID: 1653003151

Gibbone, A., & Manson, M.. (2010). Bullying: Proactive physical educators’ contribution to school-wide prevention. Journal of physical education, recreation & dance, 81(7), 20-24. Document ID: 2137650391

Katzer, C., Fetchenhauer, D., and Belschak, F. (2009). Cyberbullying: Who are the victims? A comparison of victimization in internet chatrooms and victimization in school. Journal of media psychology, 21(1), 25-36. DOI: 10.1027/1864-1105.21.1.25

Klomek, A., et al. (2009). Childhood bullying behaviors as a risk for suicide attempts and completed suicides: A population-based birth cohort study.Journal of the American academy of child and adolescent psychiatry, 48(3), 254-261. DOI: 10.1097/CHI.0b013e318196b91f

Li, Q. (2006). Cyberbullying in schools: A research of gender differences. School psychology international, 26(10), 1-14. DOI: 10.1177/01430343060xxxxx

Longwill, T. (2010). Cyberbullying: Like any disease, we need to manage It. Teacher, (May 2010), p. 48.

Mesch, G.S. (2009). Parental mediation, online activities, and cyberbullying. Cyberpsychology & behavior, 12 (4), 387-393. DOI: 10.1089/cpb.2009.0068

Pelletier, R. (2009). Cyberbullying: A real and present danger. Teacher (Aug 2009), p. 12.

Pranji, N., Bajraktarevi, A. (2010). Depression and suicide ideation among secondary school adolescents involved in school bullying. Primary health care research & development, 11(4), 349-362. DOI: 10.1017/S1463423610000307

Sourander, A., Brunstein K., Ikonen, M., Lindroos, J., Luntamo, T., Koskelainen, M., Ristkari, T., and Helenius, H. (2010). Psychosocial risk factors associated with cyberbullying among adolescents: A population-based study. Archives of general psychiatry, 67(7), 720-728.

Stephenson, J. (2010). Probing cyberbullying. The journal of the American medical association, 304(5), 513-517.

Tokunaga, R.S. (2010). Following you home from school: A critical review and synthesis of research on cyberbullying victimization. Computers in human behavior, 26(3), 277-287. DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.2009.11.014

Young, A., Hardy, V., Hamilton, C., Biernesser, K., Sun, L., & Niebergall, S.. (2009). Empowering students: using data to transform a bullying prevention and intervention program. Professional school counseling, 12(6), 413-420. Document ID: 1831413761.


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